Wonderland.

Eyes On: Feminist Practices In Dialogue

Head to the ICA today for an afternoon of live art, installations and discussions on feminism.

Much has changed since activist Shulamith Firestone formed New York Radical Women in 1967, fighting for women’s roles in society to be made equal to that of their male counterparts’. If you ask your gran, we’re sure she’ll be able to remember an era when women were not trusted to get a mortgage without their husband’s signature. In a relatively short span of time (thank goodness) we’ve managed to come a long way, and it was thanks to feminists for kicking up a fuss, for the choices that we have today – from anything as frivolous as wearing crop-tops, short-shorts and boyishly shaved hair like Agyness Deyn to owning a global fashion empire like Stella McCartney.

As ever, the ICA are encouraging discussion on fiery-topics like these and this Friday, they’ll be reflecting on how feminism has developed over the generations. Feminist Practises in Dialogue is a group effort by ten artists, Miriam Austin, Alison Ballance and Abigail Smith, Ingrid Berthon-Moine, Cécile Emmanuelle Borra, Rose Gibbs, Lora Hristova, Catherine Long, Lauren Schnieder and Nicola Thomas. Between 2.00pm and 5.30pm there will be video installations and performances taking place for people to drop in to, ending the day with a panel discussion in the theatre at 6.30pm.

We chatted to participating artist Ingrid Berthon-Moine about this divide and her work. “I consider that all women are feminists. I am fed up with the dilemma ‘yes I am but I am not’” she says. “Yes, you are a feminist because you want equal pay, you want to be represented in the news, in the arts, in politics and are against violence towards women”. Sounds spot on to us!

We’re excited to see the art works that you lot have installed. Tell us a bit more about the event?

So, the exhibition we’re doing at the ICA is the culmination of 3 years of mixed-media work and collected encounters form a group of female artists of various ages, background and interests, within a feminist based practice. I really loved the experience of working with these people.

Who was involved?

Catherine Long and Rose Gibbs are the founders of Practice in Dialogue. They have created this dynamic group of artists and they have made an environment for everyone to take part according to their abilities.

Can you tell us a bit about the work you’re contributing?

It’s very playful. The ‘I’m anti-capiphallism’ banner says it all. I like to play on words, mixing languages (my mother tongue is French). Also, in this piece, the word capiphallism is written in a shape reminiscent of the penis form on the verge of deflation… ha ha.

You’ve installed some 3D work as well as video, how did these go down?

The sculptures are also in a similar vein! I love humour. I live in Great Britain where humour is an important part of the social fabric of the British society. In my case, humour is a connector, a punctum to grab the viewer’s attention.

Words
Lizzy Nicholson
Eyes On: Feminist Practices In Dialogue

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