Wonderland.

LFW: Versus Versace SS18

Donatella taps the future faces of fashion.

The FROW Effect

When your surname is Versace and your family is set to be the subject of a major Ryan Murphy shaped TV biography, there’s no guesses for why your benches are lined with celebs; it also means that Saturday’s Versus front row was one of the hottest for famous face spotting yet this season. For SS18, Donatella extended invitations to fashion forward creative (and former Wonderbabe) FKA twigs, the little Moss sister Lottie Moss, Ne-yo (omg, throwback!) and Caroline Vreeland. Here’s hoping we’re on the list for Donatella’s next birthday bash…

A Tartan Treat

Whilst Burberry brought back its own iconic print, Versus this season produced its own tartan, opting for a grey, red and yellow check that came in trousers, bomber jackets, sleeveless macs and bralets – even making its way onto bucket hats: the Versus logo also made its way onto tartan tees and bags. In more subtle looks, small injections of tartan were used in patchwork style decorations – for those looking for something a little more understated. Elsewhere, there were classic denim injections, eveningwear with thread detailing, an extensive colour palette and random but perfect prints, ensuring it was one of the most varied collections on London’s schedule.

Cast of Creatives

With the help of one Jefferson Hack, Donatella tapped some of the future faces set to make their mark on society, showcasing in her line-up a cast of creatives and young activists who they predict will be making the difference in years to come. It’s understandable why Central Saint Martins, London’s hub for the future names and faces of fashion and the cream of the crop when it comes to creativity, was chosen as the place host this latest offering. Models included those at the start of their fashion careers, including Sarah Dahl and Felice Noordhoff, as well as fashion week fave, Adwoa Aboah.

LFW: Versus Versace SS18

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